Tea Love: Instilling a Love of Tea, One Sip At A Time

Posts tagged ‘Caffeine and Tea’

Battling Illnesses With A Cuppa? Hold On There!

We all do it.   It’s something that we’ve probably grown up hearing that we should do, as a matter of fact.

“If you’re sick, grab a cup of tea and stay in bed.”

After all, we know about all the antioxidants and polyphenols that tea contains.   It would make sense that if our immune systems are battling the dark unknown, we should give it a boost of healthy supplements to get our T cells to win the war against our colds, flus, and general illnesses.

But, what if I told you that this is not necessarily the case?

“But Catherine, you write a whole blog dedicated to tea!   Surely you believe that tea has health benefits, which have been proven by scientific study after scientific study!”

Well, yes and no.

Just like I say at my Tea Love talks, I am NOT a doctor and would never dream of giving out medical advice.   However, as my talks became more popular, more and more people were asking about the health benefits of tea, and rightfully so.   Tea is proving to become more and more popular in the United States and is usually promoted for weight loss, dental health, cancer prevention (though the National Cancer Institute does not recommend for or against the use of tea to reduce the risk of any type of cancer due to inconclusive studies), and even diabetes management.   So in response, yes, I do touch upon a few medical studies that have been performed with tea, though never advocating for any particular use.

Global News reporter Rachel Lau recently published an article addressing the question if drinking tea really does help you when you are sick.

First, make sure that what you are drinking is healthy for you.   For example, those who might have certain mental illnesses might have to watch their caffeine intake.   All forms of tea, unless it specifies caffeine free (NOT decaffeinated, which does still contain trace amounts of caffeine), do contain caffeine.   By drinking without regarding the caffeine intake, you could be doing anything from packing on the caffeine right before bed to causing more serious health issues.

Second, never self-diagnose (I am terrible at this, so do not follow my example!).   If you think that drinking a certain tea might be beneficial, talk to your doctor first.   Some plants that you might use in your teas can cause more harm than good.

Third, be wary of the studies.   While yes, there are numerous studies for everything ranging from green tea to herbal teas, they are all new studies and some do not have the greatest controls.   So while, as the National Cancer Institute says, there are studies, most are new and some do not have the support of the medical community.

Overall?   Drink tea!   Love tea!   Worship tea!   But make sure you are drinking it for enjoyment or if you are cutting down on sugars and subbing tea instead, rather than drinking it to cure an illness like cancer.

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Another Great Talk!

Hello Tea Love readers!   So, as many of you know, I just gave a Tea Love talk this past Wednesday and, my goodness, 63 people showed up to the Randolph Public Library to hear me speak!   That sort of outpouring of love and support was overwhelming!   I hope all the patrons enjoyed the talk as much as I enjoyed giving the talk 🙂   A special thanks to the Randolph Public Library for hosting me and a thank you to all who showed!

I got many questions while there and I figured I would address a few of them below.   Hope this helps you in your tea journey:

What are some different things you can do with used tea?

Compost, compost, compost.   Yes, this was my favorite answer for the talk.   I do enjoy helping the environment whenever I can and what better way than to using your tea to create something new?   Now, I have blogged about different uses for tea, including my oh-so-popular tea bag earrings, but there are many uses for tea.   For example, you can cut grease, hydrate your skin, help relieve those bags under your eyes, control odors, use it for cooking…   The possibilities are endless!   What are some of your favorite methods?

With all the scary news about different foods and everything in the news, how can you trust the tea that you buy?

That’s a tough one.   After all, we all want to ensure that our tea is of high quality and will not harm us in any way.   However, due to the ever-useful nature of tea, the FDA has trouble regulating it under the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.   After all, tea can be used for cosmetics, health reasons, and as a delightful beverage.   How does one classify it?   Honestly, the best way to go about it is to just purchase tea from a trusted retailer.   You can find tea vendors who are members of The Tea Association of the U.S.A. or research your vendors before you buy.

What is bubble tea?

Bubble tea is amazingness wrapped in awesome wrapped in fantastic.   Bubble tea is a tea-based drink, invented in the 1980s in Taiwan.   The tea is often mixed with a fruit flavor or a milk with tapioca balls, known as pearls or bobas, added to it.   You are then usually given a large straw that can fit the bobas through in order to imbibe your drink of tastiness.   Bubble tea shops are starting to sprout up more and more.   Frozen yogurt restaurants are starting to sell them as well.   I definitely would recommend finding a bubble tea shop by you so you can sample some.

Can you decaffeinate tea by brewing it longer and dumping out the old tea?

According to “Caffeine and Tea: Myth ad Reality” by Nigel Melican, it’s sort of a yes and no.   It really all depends on how long you want to brew your tea.   A study published in Food Research International breaks it down by the numbers:

30 seconds: 9% caffeine removal
1 minute: 18% caffeine removal
2 minutes: 34% caffeine removal
3 minutes: 48% caffeine removal
4 minutes: 60% caffeine removal
5 minutes: 69% caffeine removal
10 minutes: 92% caffeine removal
15 minutes: 100% caffeine removal

So yes, you can remove the caffeine from a tea by brewing it.   However, it depends on how long.   If you want to remove all of it, you’ll need to go a full 15 minutes, which is possible, but if you are looking for a brew to bring with you to work, it isn’t the most appealing option.   However, it is more holistic than some decaffeination methods, which can include chemicals to remove the caffeine.   So, make sure you pick which option you are more comfortable with.

So, those are just a smattering of questions that I received at the Tea Love talk the other day.   Want to know the answer to a question?   Feel free to comment here or write it on my Facebook wall and I will do my best to get you an answer 🙂

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