Tea And Babies – Can They Mix?

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Photo by freestocks.org on Pexels.com

So, fun fact – my sister-in-law, Amanda, is going to be bringing a baby boy into the world any day now! (worth noting that the picture to the right is not Amanda) Everyone in my family is excited for little Michael William, and all have been preparing for his arrival (everyone is also secretly hoping he is born on the 29th, making him a Leap Year Baby, but only time can tell that one). Whether it’s knitting or crocheting endless baby blankets, or getting ready to spoil that kid rotten, we are all preparing for the new joy about the bless our household.

Amanda is a huge tea fan like myself. I would even venture to say even more so. While I am also an avid coffee drinker, choosing tea more so when I am in the mood to relax, she strictly drinks tea for all scenarios. Sick? Drink tea. Tired? Tea. Relaxing? Tea.

But that got me thinking – what happens if you give a baby tea?

<insert disclaimer about how I am not a doctor and you should seek a medical professional’s advice before pursuing anything related to health>

According to WebMD, about 9% of mothers give herbal supplements to their infants under 1 year old. Mothers who use herbal supplements themselves were more likely to use them on their children.

Some baby bloggers are all on board the baby tea train. One blogger cites all the health benefits associated with rooibos tea, even going as far as to say there are no side effects associated with the beverage (warning, anyone that ever has the audacity to make such a claim either did not do their due diligent research or is flat out lying to you. Everything has side effects, whether good or bad. It’s just a matter of balancing them. To be fair, at the very end of the blog, the person does state to consult doctors and that side effects exist, they are rare, contradicting their earlier statements). And it’s true, there are a lot of health benefits associated with rooibos for adults. Another blogger goes into how to make a safe chamomile brew for your baby. Many cite tea as being a cure for colic.

That being said though, your baby is brand new to the world and will inherently react differently to things compared to good ole’ Mom and Dad. What might be good for you as an adult may not be good for your child. Though the jury is still out whether or not it is OK to give your infant teas and herbal supplements, babies under six months should still only receive breast milk and formula, using vitamins and supplements as directed by the doctor. Additionally, with tea being less regulated, numerous risks exist. And regardless, colicky babies should NOT be given tea as a form of medicine due to neurological risks.

In the end? Giving tea to babies may not be ruled as safe or unsafe yet, but it can be risky. Best suggestion from someone who is not a doctor? Leave the tea to the adults. If you are going to have a tea party with your infant, use formula only for now. At least until they are three years old.

Most Liberal Product In America – Kombucha

Admittedly, kombucha is still a bit of a mystery to me, the main reason being that I do not drink alcohol.   Once I read that it was a fermented beverage, I just thought, “Nope.”   However, watching some of my coworkers swear by it and seeing all sorts of recipes for SCOBY (the weird culture of bacteria and yeast that looks a bit like an oceanic creature), I decided to at least do a bit of research on it and know what on Earth I am talking about.

Kombucha Tea: Do the Negatives Outweigh the Positives ...

The mystery of kombucha….

For those of you who have lived blissfully unawares, kombucha, dubbed the most liberal product in America as of 2009, is an ancient Chinese tea-based drink (usually green or black tea) that is brewed with a yeast disc, yielding low levels of alcohol.   Now, it is toted as being a huge part of PepsiCo’s portfolio, despite the fact that it had an alcohol regulation scandal only a few years ago.   Health nuts love it, because it states that it contains vitamins, amino acids, and other buzz words healthy people (and the government) associate with health benefits.   This also implies a non-alcoholic base, so kids and adults can enjoy the drink.   It almost developed a cult following, with people expounding upon its properties to do everything from fix what ails ya to even curing AIDS and cancer (helpful note, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center states that kombucha has not been shown to treat cancer nor AIDS in humans).

Kombucha is prepared mostly by placing the SCOBY in sweetened tea and left to ferment at room temperature for 1-3 weeks, then bottled for 1-2 weeks to contain the CO2 that is given off and increase the natural carbonation of the drink.   From there, the drink is stored in the fridge, at which point it is ready to be sold.   The scandal happened because people did not think of the second fermentation cycle that the drink goes through:

“However, the production and distribution of kombucha halted abruptly for two months in 2010 following a Whole Foods inspection  by Maine Department of Agriculture Consumer Protection Inspector Randy Trahan. During a routine bottle audit at the Whole Foods in Portland, Trahan noticed leaking kombucha bottles. Trahan explained, “Some of the Kombucha bottles on the shelf were leaking. Being a public health official, I know that alcohol is a by-product of the fermentation process. I could immediately see that there might be a public safety issue…Kids could get hold of this and get a buzz.””

After Trahan submitted the bottles for testing, they found alcohol levels ranging from a bit over 0.5% to even going as high as over 2.5%, well above the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau’s regulations.   The drink was pulled from shelves as a result for a bit while the industry gathered itself again to try a second time in the kombucha boom.

The government stepped in and stated that it would regulate any kombucha products that contain 0.5% or more ABV, even after the product was bottled and continued to ferment.   Trade association Kombucha Brewers International was also founded as a way to educate both consumers and retailers about kombucha, as well as promote industry ethics and labeling standards, working with the government to do so.

With new regulations in place, producers went two ways – some decided to comply with the ABV standards through manufacturing changes and de-alcoholizers, while others used their original formulas and labeled their brands as beers instead.   Purists believe the de-alcoholized products stripped away the health benefits of the beverage that made it so popular in the first place.   However, sales continue to climb, estimated to be about $1.8 billion by 2020.

So, while I might try some of the de-alcoholized kombucha, there’s something to be said about its fascinating history, and the current hype surrounding the beverage!

Sit back, enjoy a cuppa, and let me know your thoughts.

Happy #NationalChocolateWeek!

First thing’s first, I want to give a great shout-out to the Orangeburg Library in Orangeburg, New York.   Yesterday, they invited me to come speak to their patrons about Afternoon Tea and give the low-down on Low Tea.   Over 20 people showed!   Everyone was in wonderful spirits, and we even got to use antique tea cups supplied by the Orangetown Museum and Archives!   I won’t lie, that was slightly nerve-wracking to use those tea cups, but it all worked out and I think we had a wonderful party.   Thank you to all who showed, and thank you to the Orangeburg Library for inviting me!   I am looking forward to my next trip out to your neck of the woods.

And now, onto tea….

Pretty much, I log into Facebook daily because I am an internet addict, as much as I might try to deny it.   I don’t rely on it for the likes or anything, but I am addicted to the recipes that flood my news feed, plus I love the puppy videos that pop up here and there.   Today, upon logging in, I learned it was National Chocolate Week over in the UK!   October 9th through the 15th, citizens across the pond are going to be hopping around to different chocolatiers to get a taste of some indulgence and celebrating a heavenly product.   But, what better way to celebrate your morsel of chocolate than with tea?

One of my favorite chocolate recipes to make are truffles.   Simple, elegant, and, most importantly, fun, you can experiment and make as many or as few as you would like.   Martha Stewart posted about jasmine tea-infused truffles, and that light floral note you get from the tea is well worth it.   Try it out and let me know what you think!

Jasmine Tea-Infused Truffles

Ingredients:

 

  • 24 ounces bittersweet chocolate, preferably Valrhona Manjari, finely chopped
  • 8 ounces milk chocolate, preferably Valrhona 42 percent, finely chopped
  • 2 cups heavy cream (not ultra-pasteurized)
  • 6 ounces Jasmine tea
  • 11 tablespoons unsalted butter, room temperature
  • 2 cups cocoa powder (not Dutch processed), preferably Valrhona, for rolling

Directions:

1. Line a 13-by-9 1/2-inch rimmed baking sheet with plastic wrap; set aside.

2. In a heatproof bowl, set over (but not touching) simmering water, melt 8 ounces bittersweet chocolate and milk chocolate together until it reaches 120 degrees.

3. Place cream in a small saucepan over medium heat; heat until cream just comes to a boil. Place tea in a medium stainless steel bowl. Pour cream over tea and let steep 10 minutes. Strain cream mixture through 4 layers of cheesecloth.

4. Remove chocolate mixture from heat and add to 1 1/3 cups cream mixture, reserving any remaining cream for another use. Using a heatproof spatula, mix together, starting from the center of the saucepan and working your way to the outer edges until mixture is emulsified. Add butter and mix with an immersion blender until well combined. Pour mixture into prepared baking sheet, evenly spreading mixture with an offset spatula; cover with plastic wrap, pressing down gently on chocolate mixture to prevent a skin from forming. Refrigerate at least 2 hours, and up to overnight.

5. Line the back of another 13-by-9 1/2-inch baking sheet with parchment paper. Uncover chocolate and invert onto parchment paper; remove second piece of plastic wrap. Using a pizza cutter or sharp knife, and a steel ruler as a guide, cut chocolate into 1-inch squares.

6. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper; set aside. Roll each square of chocolate between your hands to form a smooth ball. Transfer chocolate balls to baking sheet; refrigerate for 1 hour.

7. Melt remaining 16 ounces bittersweet chocolate in a heatproof bowl, set over (but not touching) simmering water. Place cocoa powder in a shallow dish. Place some of the melted chocolate in the palm of your hand and roll a chocolate ball in the melted chocolate to coat, then roll in cocoa powder. Repeat process with remaining chocolate balls. Transfer truffles to an airtight container, stacking truffles no more than 2 to 3 inches high, and refrigerate up to 2 weeks. Bring truffles to room temperature just before serving.

 

Pumpkin Spice EVERYTHING Season Is Back!

October has just started and yes, I have already had a pumpkin-inspired tea.   Around this time, my friends and I stalk the haunted houses, indulge in pumpkin-flavored products, and gorge enough candy where we regret ever committing to a diet in the first place.   We always hear about PSL (thank you, Starbucks), but did you know that there are plenty of healthy teas that are also pumpkin-themed?   Take a look below!

It’s Pumpkin Time! – Family Food Blog

Pumpkin Pie – Made by Premium Steap – A Lifestyle of Tea

I first found out about Pumpkin Pie from a coworker, who was kind enough to bring me a cuppa while we worked endlessly on a project (yay for that project finally being completed!).   It was my first day meeting her, and the topic of tea came up (of course it did).   She told me about this magical Pumpkin Pie and I tried it.   It warmed every sense within, and the taste was divine.   Seriously, I know I rave about tea, but I often sort of shy away from some of the more specialty flavors since sometimes, they just overdo the hype.   But the blend contains pumpkin, cinnamon, and other spices without leaving a gritty or powdery taste in it.   And the best part?   You actually taste the pumpkin!

Pumpkin Chai – Made by DavidsTEA

One of the things that I love about DavidsTEA is that it is environmentally conscious.   Bring in a reusable container, they will fill it up with tea.   You don’t need to drain your pocketbooks buying their air-tight containers (spoiler alert, they are quite awesome and you should keep your tea in an air-tight container regardless, but that’s another story) and their tea is mighty tasty.   One thing to keep in mind though, I tell everyone that their tea is not “pure” in the sense of it ONLY being tea.   They usually have add-ins, and Pumpkin Chai is no exception.   Doesn’t mean that it’s bad, but it does mean you might be getting some sugars that you would not otherwise get in your cuppa.   This tea is spiced with caramel, pumpkin candies, cinnamon, and cloves and advertises as being great as a latte.   Move over, Starbucks!

Sweet Harvest Pumpkin – Made by Celestial Seasonings

My heart is always torn with Celestial Seasonings.   On the one hand, I ADORE their herbal fruity teas.   On the other hand, they sometimes fall short.   This tea is a black tea, automatically making it a bit stronger, spiced with cinnamon, ginger, roasted chicory, natural pumpkin flavor, and more.   So the good news is, the strength is there, not like their peach blend.   Plus, it is also a bit different from the others which streamline to be pumpkin spice thrown into a tin of black tea and then calling it a day.

Bad news about all of these?   All of them are black teas, so all contain caffeine.   If you are looking to watch your intake for whatever reason, stick to a nice cinnamon apple.

I’m Back!

Hi everyone!

First, let me thank the Scotch Plains Public Library for hosting my Tea Love talk yesterday regarding the health benefits and advancements with tea. You guys rocked! Over twenty people, all engaged, and lots of fun.

Second, thanks for sticking around with me! So, as a writer, sometimes life gets in the way. It is hard to come up with new material on a weekly basis that would be worth reading. Then throw in general humdrums of life like full-time jobs, family and friends commitments, and more, and it is easy for things like blogging to fall to the wayside.

I missed it every moment, but I wasn’t good enough to keep up at that point.

Now, I am hoping to step up my game and get it working again! Not only did Scotch Plains invite me back to talk, I will also be speaking again in New York at the Orangeburg Library October 8th! My love for tea and for writing never died, so super excited to get started again.

So keep your eyes open on the blog and on my Facebook page for all things tea 🙂

SPECIAL POST IN THE MIDDLE OF THE WEEK, OMG!!!

So, I haven’t posted in a bit because I’ve been HUGELY busy with work (who isn’t?).   Like, stay in the office until 10:00 AM and work on Saturday kinda busy.

But I just wanted to announce THE PEQUANNOCK PUBLIC LIBRARY TEA LOVE TALK HAS BEEN RESCHEDULED!!!

Make sure to get over to the library (477 Newark Pompton Tpke. Pompton Plains, NJ 07444 Telephone (973) 835-7460) by 7:00 PM to learn all about Tea 101 and sample some amazing teas provided by my personal provider, Clara Ngo (previous owner of the Cranford shop Tea Spot, now awesome mom of a very cute child).

Questions?   Want to RSVP?   Contact Debbie Maynard, Library Director, at (973) 835-7460.

Looking forward to seeing you all there!

A Tea Love Talk Coming Up On Saturday + High Teas

Hi everyone!

Just a reminder!   This Saturday, April 25th, I will be having a Tea Love talk at the Ringwood Public Library, 30 Cannici Drive, Ringwood, New Jersey 07456.   The event will be held 2:00 – 4:00.   Tickets for members of Friends of the Library costs $20, while non-members pay $25.   All funds will benefit the Ringwood Public Library.   If you want to come, make sure you register with Elise Bedder at (973) 962-6256 Ext. 15, or email her at bedder@ringwoodlibrary.org.   Come out, have a good time, and drink some tea!   Clara, my tea supplier, just dropped off the tea last night and it all looks and smells delicious 🙂

For this Tea Love talk, I am going to be focusing on afternoon teas.   But what exactly is an afternoon tea?   How did it come about?   Why is it called afternoon tea?   And why are people so obsessed with them?

Well, first, let’s clear something up.   Many people confuse afternoon tea with another popular term, high tea.   High teas are in fact the tea that is a bit less regal.   That one is more of a dinner tea.   This is a common mistake outside of the UK, being that high tea sounds, well, higher than the afternoon tea (fun fact, high tea is also called “meat tea”, while afternoon tea is also called “low tea”, referring to the low furniture that you typically use for the ceremony.   Maybe that will help you distinguish the two?).

Afternoon teas are historically a ladies’ social, more often being enjoyed by women than men.   It started when the Duchess of Bedford became peckish one evening between meals.   Instead of waiting for her dinner like others did (and quite frankly, being that the only meals eaten at the time were breakfast and dinner at 8:00 or 9:00 due to the new invention of kerosene lamps making late dinners possible and popular, I can’t quite blame her), she decided to have tea and a snack beforehand.

Soon, she decided to invite her friends to come with her to drink tea.   This evolved to regular parties to walk through the gardens, drink tea, and snack.   When Queen Victoria picked up the custom, though, the afternoon tea concept went viral!

Popular culture depicts the afternoon tea constantly in British TV.   Elegant, graceful, proper, it seems that people became enamored with the old-world charm that is involved in having a cup of tea with family and friends.   Everyone from Downton Abbey to Keeping Up Appearances show the afternoon tea as indicating the person throwing the party is wise, beautiful, and probably wealthy.

I know personally, give me a cup of tea with good friends, some drinking out of mugs, others out of cups, some lazing around on the couch while others sit upright in a chair, and I am happy.

Make sure you come to the Tea Love talk to learn more about the afternoon tea!

Special Post – Fukushima Earthquake Rememberance

This post is something special to me.

Back in 2011, I went overseas, from New Jersey to Japan in order to visit my friend Sara, who happened to be studying Japanese as an exchange student at the time.   Sara’s mother, Sherri, and i boarded our flight in Newark, New Jersey, and landed in Narita Airport March 11, 2011.   We disembarked the plane and were walking through customs when the first wave hit – a 4.0 earthquake.   Sure, it was scary.   I remember not knowing what was going on at first and even thinking that it was turbulence from a plane taking off.   But once I saw people starting to duck and cover their heads, it hit me – this is an earthquake.

Sherri and I joined a group that was huddled in the middle of the room, drawing other frightened tourists towards us and covering our heads to protect ourselves.   Fortunately, that wave passed and we laughed it off.   Nothing big at all.   We must have looked pretty silly to those who go through earthquakes on a regular basis.

When the second one hit though, that was about a 7.2 magnitude.   Though Sherri and I did not speak any Japanese, we understood that we had to exit the building.   Watching the windows ebb and flow like ocean waves was a bit terrifying.

Sherri and I managed to leave the airport and stood outside with the others who were stranded.   Sherri, understandably, was worried about Sara, who is legally blind and was taking mass transit to meet us at Narita Airport.   We met a woman who became our angel for the trip, Masana, who stayed with us the entire time, making sure we were safe, cared for, and that we would be able to find my friend.

Finally, Sara, through walking and hitch-hiking, managed to meet us at the airport and found our rag-tag group of friends that we had made – an exchange student named Peter, Masana, mother Maureen who was meeting her daughter Meghan, and Mithras.

Through a series of events involving rolling brown-outs, frightened nights reading about nuclear reactors melting, and even a volcanic eruption, our ten-day trip all around Japan turned into a five-day race, staying with people who were nothing short of angels throughout our trip (I will never be able to give Masana, Peter, Maureen, Mithras, Hiroko, the girls dormitory of Soka University, and Momo the fully proper thank you that they deserve).

And now, I ask for your help.   Though it has been years since the earthquake occurred, the repairs will take nothing short of decades.   Please, consider donating some funds to the various relief efforts to try and rebuild after this devastating disaster.   This nation has been through so much, and any assistance that you can give to help these brave people are most appreciated.

Thank you.

Growing A Little Love <3

First and foremost…   TEA LOVE TALK SCHEDULED!

Riverdale Tea Love Talk

Riverdale Tea Love Talk

On Saturday, February 28th, I will be speaking at the Ladies Fellowship Tea for my sister-in-law’s church.   This will be starting at noon and I will go over all my tea basics, as well as bring a sampling for all of you to try.   Try and make it!

Now, onto tea…

Let me tell you, I am fortunate to have a guy that not only allows me to have my obsessive tea habits, he feeds into it and even engages in them himself!

So, for Valentine’s Day weekend that is coming up, I am going to talk about a gift he bought me in January – a tea plant!

LOVE It!

LOVE It!

Now, I am definitely not the best when it comes to plant care.   Give me an animal, a human even (just babysitting though), I can coddle it, pet it, feed it, clothe it, and make it feel like the pretty prince/princess it is.   A plant?   They cower in fear, seemingly sentient to the fact that I have caused the death of many of their plant brethren since the day I was born.   I have killed air plants, succulents, hardy mums – you name it, it probably perished by my hand at some point in 26 years.

So, needless to say, when Camilo came over to me and put this pot in my hand, I was a little nervous.   How on Earth would I be able to keep this treasure alive?   A true love hobby given to me by a true love – if I allow it to die, both he and I would be heart-broken.

So thankfully, while I have a black thumb, my father has an amazing green one, growing bountiful gardens every year and ensuring all the plant life that my family and I have accumulated over the years (what can I say?   I see a pretty plant, I still want to at least try to grow it!) stay green.   In the meantime, this has also allowed me to look up how to even care for this plant to ensure that i can one day make a proper brew out of it (PS – popping off some leaves and throwing them in a mug, while it does work, does not produce the greatest of tea.   I will look into processing the leaves another day when I have a bit more time).

Important things to note –

Tea plants are all from the Camellia genus, which is resilient and adaptable.

I know that when I first got the plant, all I could think of was, Whelp, there’s another plant to throw in the compost heap in the backyard.   Did I want to?   Of course not!   Did I think I would have to?   Admittedly, with my luck, I kind of assumed that all my plants would make it there eventually.   It is comforting to know, though, that it is resilient, so it won’t die within my first week of owning it.

Buy Camellia sinensis, not Camellia assamica.

The Camellia sinensis, which is this plant, is the Chinese variety that one can grow tea in hardy environments.   The Camellia assamica, however, is the Indian variety.   While you can produce tea still, this one is not as adaptable to the cold.   Tea bushes are best in zone 7 climates (mostly in Southeastern states), but you can grow them indoors or in greenhouses to protect against the winter.   As you can probably tell by my couch in the background of this picture, that is exactly what I am doing.

Acidic soil is great, but the plants aren’t picky.

My family has in our backyard a blueberry bush.   That thing adores acidic soil.   I was ready to possibly dig up some soil from around there, but then I found out that it is OK to just grow the plant in the same soil that I would for the vegetable garden.   This is positive news, given that if you told me to measure the pH balance of the soil, I would make a deer in the headlights look intelligent and all-knowing.

Sun or shade is good, so long as they’re not competing.

Your plant won’t grow as strong if it’s trying to get sunlight.

Be careful of too much water!

This is a mistake that I was making initially.   I keep forgetting – tea plants are used to drought-prone environments and survive dry summers.   I was watering mine regularly, which caused a lot of the leaves to fall almost immediately and turn.   I have been leaving it alone and I can hear my plant yelling, Thank you!

Wait two years for making a good amount of tea.

To make a reasonable amount of tea, wait two years.   To regularly harvest, wait five years.

So, it sounds like I have a little waiting to do.   For now though, I think I can wait on my tea by going into the stash that I have piling up on my kitchen cabinet.

Hope everyone has a happy Valentine’s Day!