New Tea Love Talks!

Hi everyone!

A quick announcement 🙂   I have not one, but TWO Tea Love talks coming up in April!

Make sure you see the fliers below and attend 🙂

I hope to see you all there!

Tea Love Talk At The Camden County Library!

Tea Love Talk At The Camden County Library!

Tea Love Talk At The Fairfield Free Public Library!

Tea Love Talk At The Fairfield Free Public Library!

 

Coffee And Tea Festival – New York City, Baby!

Next Saturday to Sunday, March 22nd – 23rd, the 9th annual Coffee and Tea Festival will take place in New York!   This event will be held at the 69th Regiment Armory, 68 Lexington Avenue (between 25th – 26th).   VIP Hour is held Saturday, March 22nd, 10:00 AM – 11:00 AM.   The general public can then join in on the fun Saturday, March 22nd, 11:00 AM – 5:00 PM and Sunday, March 23rd, 11:00 AM – 5:00 PM.   While Saturday is currently sold out, Sunday still has a few tickets left!

What is the Coffee and Tea Festival, you might ask?   Over 60 vendors from around the world selling tea in one spot, hosting tastings, and giving away gift bags!   What more can you ask for?   Not only that, there will be special foods that are meant to complement all the teas that you are tasting, adding an extra delight to the show.

Who will be at the show?   Well, a small sampling of the tea vendors include DavidsTea, serendipiTea, Harney and Sons (a favorite and a company that I had tried to work for but sadly, without luck), Damn Fine Tea, Salada (anyone remember that tea contest that Tea Love had a while back?), and many others!

As everyone who knows me knows, I am obsessed with philanthropy, charity, and giving back.   The Coffee and Tea Festival is no exception.   This year, the Coffee and Tea Festival has partnered with Cup for Education.   According to the Coffee and Tea Festival website, “Cup for Education is a non-profit organization that is helping poor, rural coffee communities of Central and Latin America build schools within their communities, and assist in providing them with teachers and the basic tools needed to educate future generations of coffee farmers. Cup for Education has bettered the education of children in over eight countries through the implementation of schools, computer labs, libraries, playgrounds, and more.”   The organization will have a booth at the festival.

A traveling tea exhibit will be present where artist Michele Brody collected tea-stained bags, asking drinkers to write their thoughts and general reflections on the tea, dubbing the exhibit “Reflections in Tea“.   Brody will be present to sip some tea with you.

Finally, the events!   Multiple events pertaining to tea and coffee will occur throughout the day.   Maybe you’ve always wanted to learn a little more about Taiwanese tea.   Or perhaps the robust black tea that, per this workshop, conquered the world!    Maybe you want to sample some tea with a cocktail, chocolate, or cheese.   Not to fret; there is a workshop for you.

The event is sponsored by:

Salada and Red Rose

Ito En

Capital Teas

– The Disney film “Saving Mr. Banks

Roast Magazine

Fresh Cup Magazine

Tea Time Magazine

The Tea House Times

The Village Voice

Got some free time?   Get on over there for the experience of a lifetime!   The next festival will be November 8th and 9th in Philadelphia.

Japan Earthquake – Three Years Later

As some of you are aware, March 11, 2014 marks the third-year anniversary of the now infamous Japanese earthquake, an 8.9 magnitude quake that triggered a tsunami, a volcanic eruption, and a nuclear meltdown.   According to Global Research, Centre for Research on Globalization, “On April 12, 2011 the Japanese government officially announced that the severity of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster had reached level 7, the highest on the International Nuclear Event Scale. Before Fukushima, the only level 7 case was the 1986 Chernobyl disaster…”

People know Japan for their famed tea ceremonies, matcha tea, and amazing atmosphere.   During the 2010-2011 school year, my good friend since fifth grade, Sara, decided to go study at Soka University, immersing herself fully into the Japanese culture and gaining some amazing friends in the process.   Sara’s mother and I decided to go on a visit to see Sara in March.   About ten minutes after Sara’s mother and my plane landed in Narita Airport, the earthquake hit and we went on a wild ride consisting of sleeping in airports, feeling tremors throughout the night, meeting amazing angels who took us in at a moment’s notice, and thanking God the moment we touched down on American soil five days later.

I could go into more detail regarding our experiences, but that might be a post for another day.

I will, however, say that the people we met there were so magnanimous, beyond compare to anyone I have ever met before.   Masana, who stayed with Sara’s mother and me while we struggled to get a hold of Sara via cell phone during the midst of the earthquake.   Not only that, she, along with foreign exchange student Peter, bought us food, drink, and kept us safe and calm during all the events while we were at the airport without any funds to support ourselves.   Hairoko, who housed us during the rolling black-outs that plagued the towns we were visiting.   Momoko, who welcomed us into the Soka University dorm room where Sara’s mother arranged our flight information.   Momoko and her friends also fed us and kept us calm during the disaster.

I still thank them for all of their help to this day, and still look at them as angels for all that they did for complete strangers.

Our Group Of Vagabonds, Eating Breakfast Thanks To Generous Strangers

Our Group Of Vagabonds, Eating Breakfast Thanks To Generous Strangers

Now, three years later, the Japanese government is still dealing with radiation levels.   They now also have to deal with radiation-contaminated water.   People are still missing after all of this time.   The people still need help.

To help the people of Japan, please consider donating to the Red Cross.   The funds aid in long-term recovery projects and general assistance to those in need.

Don’t forget these people.   They still need our help.